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June 05, 2007

Comments

Noel

Great post, Dave. At our church we hire almost exclusively from within.

We only have one guy we hired from outside the church and he was someone I had worked with at conferences for a few years. He had led worship while I spoke. We already had the synergy that we look for from hires.

We also had some campus staff move into town to work at Michigan State, but they came from a church we planted at University of Michigan so they are like cousins anyway.

As far as formal theological training, no one on staff at our church has any. We aren't against it, we have just hired from within so much that everyone's theological training has happened on site.

Brian Jones

Dave,

Really good stuff. Since we've hired 15 of the last 16 people from within, I would add that the only real downside is that your staff starts to experience inbreeding and look like the Royal Family.

The more hires come from within, the more we have to force ourselves to constantly solicit outside ideas and purposely invite cognitive dissonance to keep from becoming lopsided in our perception of things.

I'm starting to think that sometimes the best way to shake up your culture and challenge the system is to bring in someone with a completely different church experience. At least that's what I'm thinking today.

Press on.

Rindy

Good post! I am excited to read here and elsewhere that formal theological education is not a prerequisite. I am feeling a calling into ministry, have been involved in many aspects already and will be stepping out into a new avenue that may move beyond volunteering. God is leading...I'm preparing for where He takes me. THANKS!!

Dave Ferguson

Brian, I think you make a good point. About 18 months ago we realized that we had a good internal pipleline of leadership development, but not a very good external pipeline of new leaders. There are lots of great leaders "out there" too! The question is how do you connect with those leaders and help them really "get" your culture.

Noel

That is the big question. Even our campus team that moved to town from the church we planted is having a little culture shock transitioning. What works well in Ann Arbor doesn't translate as well in East Lansing.

It's a learning curve, for sure, whenever anyone comes in from the outside. I think the only real way to help them "get" your culture is to be immersed in it. It's like learning a language.

Gman

What about the flipside?

What would the disadvantages be? Letting go of someone would be harder?

And how do we get some of these "Seminary" guys to get hired?

Nancy

Our church hires mainly from within for exactly the same reasons, with mainly great results.

My question is this. What if the person who has displayed the character qualities, faithfulness and vision "buy-in" necessary for a job happens to be related to a present staff member? If the direct "chain of command" leads away from the "relationship", would you hire that person? Thanks

Nancy

Our church hires mainly from within for exactly the same reasons, with mainly great results.

My question is this. What if the person who has displayed the character qualities, faithfulness and vision "buy-in" necessary for a job happens to be related to a present staff member? If the direct "chain of command" leads away from the "relationship", would you hire that person? Thanks

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